Spooky Reads

Tag: Stephen King

doctor_sleep

With Doctor Sleep Stephen King has captured one of those numerous ‘what if’ requests that cascade along the metaverse of popular fiction. What if we met Danny Torrance, that little boy who was shocked and awed by the Overlook Hotel and its minions in The Shining, as a grown-up? Would he still shine? Would there still be bad things lurking the peripheries? And it’s a hard thing to do – to address such a topic – given the mainstream popularity…

Joe Hill's NOS4R2

Despite its many allusions to an earlier age of horror novel, NOS4A2 (U.K. title NOS4R2) is a unique tale of journeys into new worlds of awful wonder. Joe Hill’s third horror tome comes close at times (some have argued too close) to paying tribute to those works of dread writers, including the authors own father, which heavily peppered the shelving of WH Smiths and other book stores in the 1980s. However, this is a classic, powerful novel of many and…

Stephen King's The Stand

There are books, and there are books. That is, there are phone directories and there are epic tomes stuffed full of exquisitely crafted text and dutiful tales. And to be clear from the off, The Stand is no phone directory, although the sheer dominance of space it occupies on the bookshelf might make you think otherwise. So what it is about Stephen King’s 1978 horror novel that makes it places it head and shoulders above so many horror books across…

salems_lot

We take vampires in our literary settings very much for granted nowadays. Whether it be with thanks to Edward, Angel and friends, or Anita Blake, Buffy and cohorts, such novels dealing with this subject matter are common place. Then there’s good, old fashioned Dracula. Well, he has to factor into the equation somewhere, right? Granted, the prevalence of vamps may not be a bad thing. I am not going to bemoan choice or a widening of the genre by any…

night_shift

Night Shift is a collection of Altoid-strength, horror-focussed short stories. The stories here are not just strong in an almost consistent manner. They are modern classics, and I’d argue that they’re definitive in the genre. Several from this collection alone have been made into films, and justly so. There was even talk for one of the stories here, Trucks, may actually be remade into a film for what would be a third time, in the near future. There is nothing…

bag_of_bones

Bag of Bones, a 1998 horror novel by genre emperor Stephen King, is in some ways a typical book for its author. It’s got extremely strong characterisations backed with a rich weft of story-telling. There’re also multi-plot sequences spuriously kicking off alongside, but not necessarily synchronously to, one another atop a freaky picket-fence township and paranormally-infused Maine, New England setting. The style of its opening is as trademark to King as furtive glances from diminutive clusters of pale-green skinned, atavistically…

cell

Just as vampires seem to be continually redefined in the horror, urban/suburban fictional and paranormal genres, so too on occasion do the other stalwart bogeymen; that other collective being comprised of our friend, the good old zombie. Yes, they of the groaning and stirring, and slow walking – though the zombies here have less of the latter behaviour. In Stephen King’s Cell, we witness a spin on the usual brain-eating-undead fiction, from worldwide initial contamination (coupled with some of the…

the_dark_tower_one

The start may be an obvious place to begin when reviewing a seven volume book series that’s been published over a thirty year period. And that still has at least one more volume in the offing. Certain things, caveats for want of a better word, should be noted however. The Dark Tower series was begun by King in 1970 with The Gunslinger, which was published in serial form over five parts in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction –…

It’s not just the weather that’s been heating up lately (at least here in the U.K.). Stephen King’s epic fantasy/horror/sci-fi book series The Dark Tower has seen a fair amount of bubbling activity also, in regards to both print and a planned big (and small-screen) adaptations. Per the New York Post, Oscar-winning actor Javier Bardem has finally inked his signature on a contract to star as Roland Deschain in a Dark Tower three movie set along with accompanying TV-series to…

the_shining

King’s 1977 novel The Shining is a haunted house book that literally knocks the socks off of other haunted house novels. Certain others, preceding and following it, have come close to presenting their cases toward achieving similar greatness in the annals of that distinct literary horror sub-genre, but in my opinion nothing has yet toppled this great book. Titles such as Matheson’s Hell House certainly do deserve a very respectful nod of appreciation however. Stanley Kubrik’s 1980 film adaptation of…

I just wanted to wish all of our readers out there a Happy New Year!  May 2011 bring you much joy and happiness, and many, many great spooky books. Looking at my reading pile (which is as epic as Dan Simmons’ recently reviewed Carrion Comfort) I have to say that without even taking into account some of the cool new upcoming books headed our way in 2011, I’ve still a fair few volumes sprinkled in from the past few years…

The last couple of years have seen a large number of remakes and reboots of film properties.  From J. J. Abrams’ successful Star Trek remastery, to Rob Zombie’s powerful remake of the first two Halloween films, to Chris Nolan’s Batman Begins and its sequel.  The last of the caped crusader flicks alone netted a cool $1 bil.  Then there’ve been the more questionable remakes – Nightmare on Elm Street, anyone? Variety reported that there are plans afoot to remake Stephen…

desperation

This may be a strange review to read, and you may find it to be contradictory almost with the score that sits at its end.  It’s a five out of ten by the way, to save you skipping a few paragraphs down the page. First off I want to say that there is so much right about this novel that on initial reflection, if I were awarding this book a score based on what it likely set out to do…