Spooky Reads

Tag: Richard Laymon

Richard Laymon's The Beast House

Woah! Yes, that’s right. Woah! How else can one start a review of a Richard Laymon ‘Beast House’-based book, but with an exclamation. It probably should be an expletive, given Laymon’s predilection for all things excessive, but I’m feeling a little reserved at present, so a simple woah will suffice. So, where to proceed to next, expletives aside, with this review of The Beast House, sequel to the bloody, over-the-top murder and shock-fest cult pulp-horror book The Cellar? I guess…

The Cellar is the first of Richard Laymon’s Beast House series of books, comprising this novel, The Beast House, The Midnight Tour and the novella Friday Night at the Beast House. It’s not just the first book in this series, but was the first novel that Laymon ever had published, and showed us a glimpse of what would be in store from this great horror novelist. It’s a short, punchy, yet quite brutal novel, but one that doesn’t lack depth…

I’ve loved reading Richard Laymon’s horror novels since, as a teenager, I picked up a copy of his horror novel Flesh. That book totally engrossed me with its riveting, and at times quite shocking, sci-fi-tinted, story of alien infestation and zombie-like menace. Here was a horror writer who knew how to distil his words and ideas down into sharp and scary texts, time and again, to great effect. Alarums is equally punchy and precise. Its focus is upon a pair…

The Woods are Dark was one of Richard Laymon’s earliest novels. Whilst it’s certainly not the strongest amongst the many horror books which he wrote during his lifetime, it exudes much of that style which came to define one of the canon’s great contributors. He’s also a personal favourite genre writer of mine, but I won’t let that bias the review (too much). The book focuses upon the dangerous and bloodthirsty backwater community of Barlow. Those unfortunates whose travels take…

If the characters in Blood Games were aware of the unwritten, but assumed (by genre fans anyway), rules of horror novels then they’d probably think twice about taking their yearly, week-long adventure and thrill seeking vacation at the now abandoned holiday-spot the Totem Pole Lodge. But for the five girls, close friends since their hell-raising college days, if it doesn’t involve actions of excess, high-spirits and general risk-taking, then it’s probably not something worth pursuing. Threads of some of the…