Spooky Reads

Tag: James Herbert

sepulchre

The late, great British Ace of horror fiction, Mr James Herbert, sadly passed away in early 2013. He left behind him an awesome legacy of shock and terror-fuelled prose, from The Rats, through to The Magic Cottage and The Fog, to date his works have graced the shelves of book stores over a period of four decades. Herbert was hugely responsible for my burgeoning love of the darker-flavoured texts from my early teens through to present day. And it is…

James Herbert's Ash

As a huge fan of James Herbert in my youth, I’ve eagerly ploughed through many of that leading British horror author’s works. From The Rats, through The Fog and The Magic Cottage, Creed and of course Haunted, the book that launched the career of paranormal sceptic investigator David Ash, I always found his works terrifically entertaining, mixing a balance of genuine scares with highly approachable prose and healthy injections of splatterpunk. So it was with a great deal of excitement…

the_magic_cottage

When a cute young couple go house hunting, away from the big smoke of London town, they find the property of their dreams in the shape of an idyllic, but dilapidated, cottage named Gramarye. Tucked away in the harmonious folds of Hampshire’s New Forest, it initially seems out of the pair’s grasp. Luckily, a stipulation in the will of the late owner of the property that a ‘suitable person, or persons’ live in the cottage brings a welcome opportunity, and…

I just wanted to wish all of our readers out there a Happy New Year!  May 2011 bring you much joy and happiness, and many, many great spooky books. Looking at my reading pile (which is as epic as Dan Simmons’ recently reviewed Carrion Comfort) I have to say that without even taking into account some of the cool new upcoming books headed our way in 2011, I’ve still a fair few volumes sprinkled in from the past few years…

the_fog

There have been numerous takes on the non-meteorologically induced fog and mist-based themes.  The Mist by Stephen King does a great job of highlighting both terror from the unknown of the fog, and raised tensions in fear of what may lurk within a community’s paranoid heart.  John Carpenter’s movie is a tale of ghostly revenge, with those killed a century before wreaking vengeance from within a fog bank. Herbert’s The Fog is an exercise in literary terror, as a yellow…